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C

  • Court of admiralty

    A rather archaic term used to denote the court which has the right to hear shipping, ocean and sea legal cases. Also known as "maritime law".
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  • Covenant

    A written document in which signatories either commit themselves to do a certain thing, to not do a certain thing or in which they agree on a certain set of facts. They are very common in real property dealings and are used to restrict land use such as amongst shopping mall tenants or for the purpose of preserving heritage property.
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  • CP

    Custodial Party
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  • Creditor

    A person to whom money, goods or services are owed by the debtor.
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  • Creditor's Remedies

    The area of law dealing with the legal means and procedures to collect debts and judgments.
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  • Crime

    An act or omission which is prohibited by criminal law. Each state sets out a limited series of acts (crimes) which are prohibited and punishes the commission of these acts by a fine, imprisonment or some other form of punishment. In exceptional cases, an omission to act can constitute a crime, such as failing to give assistance to a person in peril or failing to report a case of child abuse.
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  • Criminal conversation

    Synonymous with adultery. In old English law, this was a claim for damages the husband could institute against the adulterer.
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  • Criminal Law

    public law that deals with crimes and their prosecution. This area of law is usually governed by statute or ordinance.
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  • Cross-examination

    In trials, each party calls witnesses. Each party may also question the other's witness(es). When you ask questions of the other party's witness(es), it is called a "cross-examination" and you are allowed considerably more latitude in cross-examination then when you question your own witnesses (called an "examination-in-chief"). For example, you are not allowed to ask leading questions to your own witness whereas you can in cross-examination.
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  • Crown

    The word refers specifically to the British Monarch, where she is the head of state of Commonwealth countries. Prosecutions and civil cases taken (or defended) by the government are taken in the name of the Crown as head of state. That is why public prosecutors are referred to, in Canada, as "Crown" prosecutors and criminal cases take the form of "The Crown vs. John Doe" or "Regina vs. John Doe", Regina being Latin for "The Queen."
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  • CSE

    Child Support Enforcement Agency
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  • CSENet

    Child Support Enforcement Network
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  • CTX

    Corporate Trade Exchange
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  • Cuius est solum, ejus est usque ad caelum et ad inferos

    Latin: who owns the land, owns down to the center of the earth and up to the heavens. This principle of land ownership has been greatly tempered by case law which has limited ownership upwards to the extent necessary to maintain structures. Otherwise, airplanes would trespass incessantly.
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  • Culpa lata

    Latin for gross negligence. It is more than just simple negligence and includes any action or an omission in reckless disregard of the consequences to the safety or property of another.
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  • Curtilage

    The yard surrounding a residence or dwelling house which is reserved for or used by the occupants for their enjoyment or work. Curtilage may or may not be inclosed by fencing and includes any outhouses such as stand-alone garages or workshops. It is a term one might come across in a search warrant which calls for a search of the residence its' curtilage of a particular person.
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  • Custodial Parent

    person with legal custody and with whom the child lives; may be parent, other relative, or someone else
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  • Custody

    Means the charge and control of a child including the right to make all major decisions such as education, religious upbringing, training, health and welfare. Custody, without qualification usually refers to a combination of physical custody and legal custody. For other varieties of custody, see joint custody, split custody and divided custody.
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  • Custody Order

    legal determination which establishes with whom a child shall live
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  • Cy-près

    "As near as may be": a technical word used in the law of trusts or of wills to refer to a power that the courts have to, rather than void the document, to construct or interpret the will or a trust document "as near as may be" to the actual intentions of the signatory, where a literal construction would give the document illegal, impracticable or impossible effect.
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