How Long After An Injury Do I Have To Report It To My Employer?

If you are injured at work or believe that an injury or illness is work­related, the following steps may be helpful. The steps in this list are not required by statute. If you are unable to do these things for yourself, ask someone to do them for you.

  • Note the hour, date, cause of the accident or illness, and the names of any witnesses to the accident. If possible, obtain a written statement from these witnesses. This information may be important in pursuing your claim.
  • Immediately report the accident and injury to your supervisor, first aid person, company nurse or physician, or directly to your employer. Do not wait to report injuries or illnesses and do not conceal injuries or illnesses if you wish to pursue a worker`s compensation claim.
  • If you work for a unionized employer, report the injury to your union representative.
  • Request medical treatment under worker`s compensation.
  • Do not sign any papers unless you understand what you are signing. However, remember that your signature may be required at various steps in the handling of your claim. Your delay in signing may lead to a delay in receiving compensation.
  • You do not have to allow claims investigators to take a tape recorded statement from you as a condition for receiving worker`s compensation.
  • If your claim is denied, you have the right to a hearing before the Worker`s Compensation Board.

The information on this page is meant to provide a general overview of the law. The laws in your state and/or city may deviate significantly from those described here. If you have specific questions related to your situation you should speak with a local attorney.

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