What Fees are Generally Involved with Probate?

In addition to court fees, the personal representative, attorney and other professionals whose services may be required in administering the estate (such as appraisers and accountants) are entitled by law to reasonable compensation.

Personal representative fees are typically set forth in the will or in a contract set forth between the personal representative and decedent, as agreed among the personal representative and the persons who bear the impact of the fee, as presumed to be reasonable as calculated under prevailing state law (if the amount is not objected to), or by the judge applying the prevailing state law.

Attorney fees are typically set forth as agreed among the attorney, personal representative and the persons who bear the impact of the fee; as presumed to be reasonable calculated under prevailing state law (if the amount is not objected to); or as determined by the judge applying the prevailing state law. And, other professionals who may be involved will generally charge their standard fees (hourly or flat fee) for services they provide.

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