Your Rights As A Landlord

If you are a landlord, you can rent your property for whatever amount you choose, although you may not raise rent during the term of a lease and you must give proper notice to your tenant of any change if there is a periodic tenancy (week­to­week or month­to­month). You may rent to whomever you wish and you may set any terms in your rental agreement you wish, provided that they are not contrary to local, state or federal laws. You do not have the right to relieve yourself of duties imposed on landlords by the law. While generally you may refuse to rent to anyone, you may not discriminate against a tenant or prospective tenant because of his race, color, religion, ancestry, sex, country of birth, handicap or familial status. The prohibition against discrimination based on familial status makes it illegal, in most circumstances, to refuse to allow children to live in a residential unit. You may evict a tenant, who violates any provision of your rental agreement, which you and the tenant have agreed is a ground for eviction. Failure to pay rent is always grounds for eviction. You may reserve the right to enter, inspect and make repairs on or show the rental property at reasonable times and in a reasonable manner. You have the right to have your property returned to you in the same condition as it was when the tenant took possession, with the exception of ordinary wear and tear and damage done by natural forces or people other than the tenant or his guests.

The information on this page is meant to provide a general overview of the law. The laws in your state and/or city may deviate significantly from those described here. If you have specific questions related to your situation you should speak with a local attorney.

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