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What Is A Deductible?

A deductible is an amount of money you agree to pay as part of a claim before the insurer is committed to pay the rest of the claim. For example, if you carried collision coverage with a $200 deductible and you had a $500 loss, you would have to pay $200 and the insurance company would have to pay the remaining $300. Basically, deductibles reduce your premiums because you agree to deduct an amount from the claim your insurer otherwise would have to pay. Insurance companies offer deductibles because they reduce the number of small claims which are costly for them to handle. If you purchase a new car with a loan, the financial institution that lent you the money may require you to purchase collision coverage. This is because they see your car as collateral for the loan, and they want to make certain it is worth something if they need to repossess the vehicle.

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This article is intended to be helpful and informative. But even common legal matters can become complex and stressful. A qualified insurance lawyer can address your particular legal needs, explain the law, and represent you in court. Take the first step now and contact a local insurance attorney to discuss your specific legal situation.

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