Other Enforcement Techniques

Other child support enforcement techniques include: liens, federal and state income tax refund intercepts, unemployment and state disability intercepts, lottery intercepts, writs of execution, contempt proceedings, suspension of professional licenses, driver`s licenses and recreational licenses and also credit approval risk. Specific examples of techniques that may be used are:

  • Internal Revenue Service Tax Refund Intercept System ­ Intercepts non­custodial parents` federal income tax refunds to pay their past­due child support.
  • Franchise Tax Board Tax Refund Intercept System ­ Intercepts non­custodial parents` state income tax refunds to pay their current and past­due child support.
  • Unemployment Insurance Benefit Intercept System ­ Intercepts a portion of state unemployment payments owed to non­custodial parents to pay their current and past­due child support.
  • Disability Insurance Benefit Intercept System ­ Intercepts a portion of state disability payments owed to non­custodial parents to pay their current and past­due child support.
  • Lottery Winners Intercept ­ Intercepts lottery winnings owed to non­custodial parents to pay current and past­ due child support.
  • Credit Report System ­ Reports the names of non­custodial parents who have court orders requiring that they pay support, to all major credit reporting companies as good or bad credit risks.
  • Passport Denial ­ Denies passport applications of non­custodial parents who have ever been submitted into the tax intercept program owing more than $5,000 in past­due child support.
  • Financial Management Services Intercept ­ Intercepts federal administrative payments owed to non­custodial parents to pay their current and past­due child support.
  • State Licensing Match System (SLMS) ­ Denies permanent state­issued business, professional and driver`s licenses (for example: cosmetologist, contractor, doctor, teacher, attorney, truck driver) to non­custodial parents who owe past­due child support and apply for a license or a renewal.
  • SLMS denies these same licenses to non­custodial parents who are four months or more behind in paying support whether or not they are renewing.
  • SLMS revokes the licenses of any non­custodial parent who fails to continue to comply with an agreement to pay past­due support in order to obtain a license.
  • New Hire Registry ­ All employers are required to report all new or rehired employees to the Employment Development Department within 20 days. Matches with the New Hire Registry provide the FSD or local child support agency with early identification when a non­custodial parent becomes employed anywhere in the United States. Once verified, this information is used to establish and enforce wage withholding orders.
  • Financial Institutions Data Match ­ Identifies and levies any assets held by a financial institution that belong to non­custodial parents who owe past­due child support.
  • Statewide Utility Match System ­ By matching the records of utility service providers (gas, electric, and telephone) this system locates addresses for non­custodial parents who owe past­due child support. Locating a valid address is often an important first step in other enforcement actions such as establishing a wage withholding order.
  • Assets Match Program ­ Identifies interest and dividend income paid to non­custodial parents who owe past­due child support.
  • Workers Compensation Appeals Board Match System ­ Collects workers` compensation lump sum payments owed to non­custodial parents who owe past­due child support.
  • Board of Equalization Sales and Use Tax Intercept System ­ Intercepts sales and/or use tax refunds owed to non­custodial parents who owe past­due child support.
  • Alaska Permanent Fund Dividend Match ­ Intercepts dividend payments owed to non­custodial parents who owe past­due child support.
  • Support Order Registry ­ The Support Order Registry began in October 1998. Currently, support order data resides at the local FSD or local child support agency for cases managed by the District Attorney and similar data is kept in a statewide database for private child support orders. Both custodial and non­custodial parents must update the Support Order Registry when any information changes. Information from this registry will be provided to authorized persons only.

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