Why Would I Be Denied Benefits?

You may be denied benefits if you become unemployed for reasons other than lack of work. If you quit your job without good cause, you will be denied benefits until you work at least eight weeks and earn at least $123 in each week. If you are fired for proved misconduct connected with your job, you will be denied benefits until you work at least eight weeks and earn at least $123 in each week. If you refuse a suitable job offer, you will be denied benefits until you work at least eight weeks and earn at least $123 in each week. If you become unemployed because of a labor dispute, you may be denied benefits. Whenever a question arises about your eligibility for benefits you will have an opportunity to present your side of the case. You may bring witnesses or someone to represent you. You should bring any documents or other evidence that will support your claim. You will receive a decision that will either approve your claim or tell you why, and for how long, you are denied benefits. You have the RIGHT TO APPEAL any decision with which you do not agree, by submitting a request in writing to the central Adjudication Unit at PO Box 20067, Cranston, RI 02920­0941 or by FAX at (401) 462­8318. Your case will be assigned to a Referee (Hearing Officer) at the Board of Review who will schedule a hearing at which time you may state your argument in detail. The Board is an impartial authority not under the direction of the Department of Labor and Training.

The information on this page is meant to provide a general overview of the law. The laws in your state and/or city may deviate significantly from those described here. If you have specific questions related to your situation you should speak with a local attorney.

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