Are There Restrictions On The Hours That A Minor May Work?

If subject to both Federal/State laws, fourteen and fifteen year­old minors may not be employed:

  1. During school hours. (An exception is provided for minors employed pursuant to work experience and career exploration {WECEP} program.)
  2. Before 7 AM or after 7 PM, except from June 1 through Labor Day, when evening hours are extended to 9 PM.
  3. More than three hours per day, on school days.
  4. More than eight hours per day, on non­school days.
  5. More than 18 hours per week, in school weeks.
  6. More than 40 hours per week, in non­school weeks.

If subject to State law only, 12, 13, 14 and 15­year old minors may not be employed:

  1. During school hours.
  2. Before 7AM or after 9PM.
  3. More then 3 hours per day on school days.
  4. More then 8 hours per day on non­school days.
  5. More than 23 hours per week, in school weeks.
  6. More than 48 hours per week, in non­school weeks.

Sixteen and seventeen year­old minors duly enrolled in school may not be employed:

  1. More than 6 consecutive days, nor more then 30 hours per week during the school calendar week (Sunday through Saturday).
  2. More than 6 consecutive days nor more then 48 hours per week during school vacation weeks or summer vacation (June 1 through Labor Day).
  3. More than 10 hours per day in manufacturing, nor more than 10­1/4 hours per day in manual or mechanical labor, nor more than 8 hours per night, if working at night.

If you are 16 or 17 years old and not enrolled in school, you may not be employed:

  1. In manufacturing more than 10 hours per day, nor more than 48 hours more week.
  2. In manual or mechanical labor, more than 10­1/4 hours per day, nor more than 54 hours per week.
  3. Night work is restricted to no more than 8 hours per shift and 48 hours per week.

(Where a minor is employed in the same day or week by more than one employer in manual or mechanical labor, the total time of employment shall not exceed the allowed per day or week in a single employment.)

The information on this page is meant to provide a general overview of the law. The laws in your state and/or city may deviate significantly from those described here. If you have specific questions related to your situation you should speak with a local attorney.

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