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How Much Compensation Can I Receive?

Your Weekly Benefit Amount (WBA) is shown on your "Wage Transcript and Benefit Computation". Your WBA is based on the highest wages you earned in any one quarter of the base period. Your WBA is: five percent of the first $2000 you earned in the highest quarter plus four percent of the amount over $2000 in the highest quarter. As of July 1, 2002, the maximum weekly benefit amount is $336. The total amount of your claim is limited by your Maximum Benefit Amount (MBA). It is shown on your "Wage Transcript and Benefit Computation." Your MBA cannot be more than twenty­eight percent of your total base period wages. Your MBA cannot be more than twenty­six times your Weekly Benefit Amount. As of July 1, 2002, the maximum benefit amount is $7900. You may draw benefits for up to twenty­six weeks or until your Maximum Benefit Amount (MBA) has been reached. Your claim is good through the ending date of your Benefit Year (BYE). This allows you to reopen your claim if you become unemployed more than once in that benefit period. The BYE is 52 weeks beginning with the first week you filed your claim. You may qualify for partial benefits if your employer reduces your work hours to less than your regular full­time work week, and you earn less than your Weekly Benefit Amount (WBA). If you earn less than twenty percent of your weekly benefit amount from an employer that is not listed on your wage transcript, no deduction will be made from your benefit check. If you earn more than twenty percent of your weekly benefit amount from an employer that is not listed on your wage transcript, after twenty percent has been earned, a dollar­for­dollar deduction will be made from your benefit check. If you work odd jobs for anyone other than your base period employer, a dollar­for­dollar deduction will be made after the amount equal to twenty percent of your weekly benefit amount has been earned. If any wages are earned from a base period employer, a dollar­for­dollar deduction will be taken from your benefit check.

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