When is Spousal Support or Alimony Awarded in Oregon?

In Oregon, a court may award spousal support if it is just and equitable. Transitional spousal support may be needed to allow a spouse to obtain the education or training necessary to reenter the job market. In determining if transitional spousal support is just and equitable the court will consider: the duration of the marriage; a party’s training and employment skills; a party’s work experience; the financial needs and resources of each party; the tax consequences to each party; a party’s custodial and child support responsibilities; and any other factors the court deems just and equitable. Compensatory spousal support may be awarded when there has been a significant financial or other contribution by one party to the education, training, vocational skills, career or earning capacity of the other party and when an order for compensatory spousal support is otherwise just and equitable in all of the circumstances. The factors to be considered by the court in awarding compensatory spousal support include but are not limited to: the amount, duration and nature of the contribution; the duration of the marriage; the relative earning capacity of the parties; the extent to which the marital estate has already benefited from the contribution; the tax consequences to each party; and any other factors the court deems just and equitable. Spousal maintenance may also be awarded from one spouse to another for an indefinite time if it is just and equitable considering:  the duration of the marriage; the age of the parties; the health of the parties, including their physical, mental and emotional condition; the standard of living established during the marriage; the relative income and earning capacity of the parties, recognizing that the wage earner’s continuing income may be a basis for support distinct from the income that the supported spouse may receive from the distribution of marital property; a party’s training and employment skills; a party’s work experience; the financial needs and resources of each party; the tax consequences to each party; a party’s custodial and child support responsibilities; and any other factors the court deems just and equitable. (Oregon Statutes, Chapter 107, Section 107.105)

The information on this page is meant to provide a general overview of the law. The laws in your state and/or city may deviate significantly from those described here. If you have specific questions related to your situation you should speak with a local attorney.

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