Theft in Nevada

What is theft under Nevada law?

Under Nevada Revised Statutes (NRS) 205.0832, theft is when you take control over someone else’s property with the intent to deprive him or her of the property.

What is the punishment for theft?

If the theft involves property worth less than $250, you would be charged with a misdemeanor, which carries a jail sentence of up to 6 months, as well as a fine of up to $1,000. If the theft involves property valued between $250 and $2500, the theft can be charged as a C felony, which carries a jail sentence of 1 – 5 years and a fine of up to $10,000. If the theft involves property valued at over $2500, the theft can be charged as a B felony, which carries a jail sentence of 1 – 10 years, and a fine of up to $10,000. Additionally, whatever the charge, you will be required to pay restitution to the victim of the theft. You can find these penalties set out in detail at NRS 205.0935.

What is grand larceny?

Under NRS 205.220, grand larceny involves intentionally stealing or taking property worth more than $250, which consists of personal goods, furniture, or other belongings. Grand larceny is a felony. The charge can be a B felony if a firearm is involved, and a C felony if a motor vehicle is involved. Plus, if the motor vehicle is worth more than $2500, then the charge can be a B felony.

What is petit larceny?

Under NRS 205.240, petit larceny is stealing items worth less than $250, and typically involves shoplifting. If you are caught shoplifting then, you will face a misdemeanor charge. 

Can I be civilly liable for items that I stole?

Yes. Under NRS 205.280, the victim of a theft can be awarded the value of the property at the time of the theft.

What is the punishment for possessing stolen property?

Possessing stolen property follows the same scheme for general theft charges, which are based on the value of the stolen item(s), as per NRS 205.275. If the value of the property is under $250, it is a misdemeanor. If the value of the property is between $250 and $2500, it is a C felony. If the value of the property is over $2500, it is a B felony. As with theft in general, you will be responsible for paying restitution to the victim if convicted.

What is the punishment for writing bad checks?

Writing bad checks qualifies as larceny under NRS 205.260. If the value of the check(s) is less than $250, you can be charged with a misdemeanor. If the value of the check(s) is more than $250 within a 90-day period, however, you can be charged with a D felony, which carries a jail sentence of 1 – 4 years in jail, and a fine of up to $5000. Additionally, you will be responsible for paying restitution to the victim if convicted.

What is the difference between robbery and burglary?

Robbery, as per NRS 200.380, involves an unlawful taking of a person’s property against his or her will, by means of force, violence, or fear of injury to the person or property. On the other hand, burglary, as per NRS 205.060, involves entering a building or other structure with the intent to steal property. Both crimes are charged as B felonies.

The information on this page is meant to provide a general overview of the law. The laws in your state and/or city may deviate significantly from those described here. If you have specific questions related to your situation you should speak with a local attorney.

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