Resource Library

Free Online Legal Resources

What Is Probable Cause?

This is a difficult one. There is not a bright-line rule establishing precisely what is and what is not probable cause. However, what has become apparent is that a finding of probable cause requires objective facts indicating a likelihood of criminal activity. A police officer’s hunch, with nothing more, will not satisfy the requirements.

Example: Officer Doright observes Tom and Dick walking down the street. Officer Doright has a hunch that Tom and Dick are up to no good. Armed with nothing more, Officer Doright goes to the local judge and attempts to get a search warrant for the boy’s home. Should a judge grant the warrant? No. A police officer’s hunch, with nothing more, will not satisfy the probable cause requirement. However, if Officer Doright observed Tom and Dick conduct a drug deal, then probable cause would likely exist for a warrant to search their home.

Speak to an Experienced Fourth Amendment Unreasonable Search & Seizure Rights Attorney Today

This article is intended to be helpful and informative. But even common legal matters can become complex and stressful. A qualified fourth amendment unreasonable search & seizure rights lawyer can address your particular legal needs, explain the law, and represent you in court. Take the first step now and contact a local fourth amendment unreasonable search & seizure rights attorney to discuss your specific legal situation.

Additional Fourth Amendment Unreasonable Search & Seizure Rights Articles

Search LawInfo's Fourth Amendment Unreasonable Search & Seizure Rights Resources

Find an Attorney in Your Area