What Are My Options For Action Under The Lemon Law?

If your manufacturer either fails to make a final attempt to repair the defect, or if the defect still exists after such an attempt, you may seek to receive a replacement vehicle or a refund via the following options:

Manufacturer­Sponsored Arbitration: If the manufacturer has a dispute settlement procedure that complies with Federal Trade Commission regulations, the law requires that you utilize such a procedure before you may file a lawsuit under the Lemon Law.

Arbitration, also known as informal dispute settlement, is an informal process consumers may use to obtain speedy resolution of a warranty dispute without having to go to court, and it is legally binding on the manufacturer. At an arbitration hearing, the seller and buyer testify before an arbitrator about the condition of the vehicle.

You can find out if your manufacturer sponsors a certified arbitration program by reading the information accompanying your warranties, asking your dealer for information, or by contacting the Rhode Island Office of the Attorney General.

Court Action: If the manufacturer does not have a certified arbitration program, or if you have rejected the decision of a certified program, you may file a lawsuit against the manufacturer in court.

If you are seeking court action, you should consult an attorney.

You must file a lawsuit under the Lemon Law within three years of date of delivery, or within two years after your vehicle reached 15,000 miles.

If the court finds in your favor, you may be reimbursed for any reasonable attorney`s fees.

The information on this page is meant to provide a general overview of the law. The laws in your state and/or city may deviate significantly from those described here. If you have specific questions related to your situation you should speak with a local attorney.

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