How Should I Prepare My Lemon Law Claim?

  1. Keep copies of all purchase orders, sales receipts, lease agreements, warranties, repair invoices, letters and other documents concerning your vehicle and any of its problems.
  2. If your vehicle is in the shop for repairs for more than one day at a time, make sure that the repair invoice shows the date it was brought in and the date you were notified that it was ready to be returned.
  3. If you think you are eligible for a refund or replacement vehicle, remember the law requires written notice be given to the manufacturer, zone representative or authorized dealer. You should send a letter by certified mail, with a return receipt requested. If you send the letter to the dealer, send a copy to the manufacturer and keep a copy for your records. You should include the following information in your letter:
    • Your name, address and telephone number.
    • The date you purchased or began leasing the automobile.
    • A list of defects and systems affected.
    • The number of times the vehicle has been subject to repairs for the same problem, and the dates of the repairs.
    • A statement that the defect still exists as of the date of the letter.
    • A reference to the lemon law (Minnesota Statutes, section 325F.665) and a statement that you will pursue a replacement or refund claim under this law if the vehicle is not made to conform to the warranty.
    • A request for information about the company`s arbitration program.

    Remember, the refund and replacement provisions of the lemon law are intended to provide a replacement or a refund only in the cases of the most serious defects 34 faults which seriously impair the use or market value of the vehicle, or faults which involve life­threatening failures of the braking and steering systems.

The information on this page is meant to provide a general overview of the law. The laws in your state and/or city may deviate significantly from those described here. If you have specific questions related to your situation you should speak with a local attorney.

Additional Lemon Law Articles

Search LawInfo's Lemon Law Resources